Collective Arts IPA No. 10 ?

 

I usually quite like the beers coming from Collective Arts  in Hamilton, Ontario, but IPA No. 10 bends my palate and mind into a space I don’t want to go!

IPA10

While it is only 3.2 percent abv, and unfiltered, it is muddy, top to bottom, and therefore unrecognizable as beer.

 
Sorry, perhaps juicy is the new vernacular.
No, it is actually, really turbid.

 
This beer is hopped with Simcoe and mosaic hops, as if you would notice among the mango-mashed mud flavour.

 

It is undrinkable. I dumped it
Damn. It is okay. I paid for it!
Please, all breweries, stop brewing this murky stuff.

 
I might swear if this becomes the new norm.
Oh shit, it has!

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Ontario Brews

Town Brewery of Whitby has opened with Levon Saison, a 6 percent abv Belgian style
saison. It is a pale lemon coloured beer that is quite effervescent in nature. The initial action is a tongue-tapping spiciness, with cloves to the forefront. On the palate, the aromatics fold over and deliver vigorous spice notes. The finish is on-form and sprightly.

Next up is a collaboration of the Town Brewery with Muddy York of Toronto in brewing New England IIPA, an 8.7 percent abv brew that is big, bold and beautiful. It is suitably hazy and pale orange in colour. There is a sprightly burst of citrus aromas. On the palate, it is surprisingly gentle on the hop bitterness front. However, the bitterness builds neatly and assumes its rightful place directing the show right through to the gloriously bitter finish.

Town Brewery has also released Mash of the Titans IPA, a 6.5 percent abv beer. It pours a cloudy pale yellow colour and is citrusy and effervescent. On the palate, fruit and bitterness are seemingly masked by the density of suspended material. The finish is tangy and mildly bitter. I suspect that there is a big beer lurking somewhere in the mists. townbrewery.ca

Prospect DDH Simcoe Single Hop IPA, brewed by the Left Field Brewery of Toronto, rides in at 6.7 percent abv. It pours a veiled straw colour, while releasing aromatics of tropical fruit, spice and a deep forest green. This is followed by a smack-down of hop bitterness, with just a kiss of the barley to carry it all forward. The finish is boldly bitter and increasingly moreish!

jamie mistryThe Common Good Beer Company of Toronto began brewing as a contract brewery in 2016 according to co-founder Jamie Mistry (left). Over 90 percent of what they brew is contract, for the likes of Radical Road, Black Bellows, Danforth, Beaches and Lost Craft.

The 35 hectolitre, five vessel, Newlands brewhouse is located in a 12,000 square foot building. The brewery has 14 X 70 hectolitre fermenters and 3 X 70 hectolitre bright tanks.

Common Good has released Caught in an Eddy Session IPA as part of its Brewers’ Series. This pale-straw coloured ale tops out at 3.9 percent abv and it has a gentle, refreshing hop presence on the nose. On the palate, hop bitterness slides forward and embraces a resilient malt backbone. The finish is hop-forward and sustained to a level that suggests another might be in order, an order?!

 

Also, from Common Good comes its Bonsai Kitten White IPA, a 7.7 percent abv polished, pale gold coloured ale. It presents crisp malt with a cut of the hop on the nose. On the palate, malt leads the way but hop bitterness surges forward and above the alcohol. The finish is clean and increasingly bitter.

Dry Hop Pils from Common Good has a bright, pale yellow colour and aromatics of spicy fresh hops. On the palate, sprightly, peppery hops deliver a forthright message of goodness. This is followed by a long, engaging, floral and bitter finish.

The Sociable Pilsner is a German style pilsner brewed by Common Good to 4.7 percent abv, while delivering 35 IBUs of bitterness. It pours a sparkling golden colour, while releasing fresh grain and light hop notes. Malt and hops co-mingle happily on the palate. The crisp finish is refreshingly bitter.

The Amsterdam Brewery of Toronto has loaded up the hops on its Fracture Imperial IPA to the tune of 95 IBUs. This 9.1 percent abv ale has an amber colour. Pithy pine and citrus notes are prevalent on the nose. On the palate, hop bitterness assertively parts the waves of malt goodness. The finish belies its 95 IBUs–while it is pungently bitter, it does not overwhelm!

From the unusually named Orange Snail Brewers Limited of Milton comes Iron Pig Pale Ale, a 5 percent abv orange coloured beer. Aromas of sweetish malt and a light spiciness are presented early. On the palate, a light bitterness intersects the malt core. The finish sees the single malt grain gain the upper hand over the hop presence in this unpasteurized ale.

Working Twice as Hard DIPA is brewed by the Muddy York Brewing Company of Toronto to 8.2 percent abv and 30 IBUs. This cloudy, golden coloured ale has a nose of tropical fruit. On the palate, a pleasantly soft hop bitterness intertwines with a flexible malt backbone. The finish is gentle on the hop expression and the alcohol does not rise to the top and request undo attention.

Cerbeerus, a 5.2 percent abv collaborative wet hop pilsner brewed by Brunswick Bierworks and Muddy York, features three additions of Perle hops. It pours a bright gold colour and releases floral hops on the nose. This is followed a forthright hop attack on the palate. The finish delivers more wonderful hop flavours to enthrall.

A collaborative brew from the Eastbound Brewing Company, Toronto, and the Sawdust City Brewing Company, Huntsville, has resulted in a festive brew, Hold On, I’m Comin’ Home for the Holidays, a Belgian Christmas ale topping out at 8.5 percent abv. This polished auburn coloured ale showcases spicy aromatics of cinnamon and nutmeg. On the palate, sweetish malt is embraced by spices, with the alcohol in check. The finish is bright, with a splash of alcohol overlaying rich, chewy malt and Christmas spices.

Eastbound also released Fresh Start Idaho 7 APA, riding in at 5 percent abv. It pours a pale golden colour with a slight haze. There is a whiff of fresh green hops on the nose. On the palate, a sprightly hop presence leads to a strengthening hop bitterness. The lasting, bitter finish entices greatly as the delicious hop bitterness grows in intensity to that level where you not only want another one, but you order it!

Town Brewery
1632 Charles Street
Whitby ON L1N 1B9
905 666 3838

Common Good Beer Company
475 Ellesmere Road
Scarborough ON M1R 4E5
416 639 6579

Muddy York Brewing Company, Toronto

The Muddy York Brewing Company opened its doors in January of 2015 in the midst of a burgeoning beer market in Toronto and across Ontario. Husband and wife team, Jeff Manol and Susan Michalek, owned a sturdy building which housed the family’s tool and die company. Conversion to a brewery was eased by this fact, though its location in East York, among other manufacturing businesses and removed from any foot trade, made it quite a challenge for the duo to make it a destination.

on_muddy york tap roomThe addition of a 45-seat tap room catered to by food trucks proved to be the way forward. Some people come for a beer and a bite, while others head straight to the loaded beer fridge to see what is new. Most people happily leave with a four-pack or greater. Now over 60 percent of sales are straight out the front door, which is good for the bottom line.

The opening of Brunswick Bierworks nearby also helped to elevate the area as a beer destination. Muddy York has a couple of beers, Helles and Heffeweizen, brewed and packaged by Brunswick. Brewer Jeff Manol says he has always been a beer guy but that he really caught the bug from homebrewing.

“At the time that we started thinking about opening a brewery, five or six years ago, the brewing landscape was much different than it is today. The decision was not difficult at all. I loved brewing and wanted to do it full time, so I just started working at it. I liked that the science and creativity of brewing was all wrapped up in one,” said Manol.
Currently, he operates a 10 hectolitre, all electric system. There are seven fermenters and two bright beer tanks. It takes about eight hours for a brew to go through the system. The brewery manually bottles some beer but they also use the services of a canning truck.
“Our roles are so different within the brewery that we don’t really get in each other’s way. We meet and discuss things when necessary, then go back to our respective tasks. We see eye to eye on pretty much everything to do with running the business and how we want to move forward, so there’s really no issues. We’re together because we love each other, so running the brewery is just an extension of that,” said Jeff.

muddy york brewhouseAt any one time, you will find 12 beers on tap, 16 in the fridge, and a further eight in the fermenters.
Manol says he likes to brew a cross-section of beer styles to provide variety and to keep things interesting for his growing customer base. He said as the company grows it depends more heavily on logistics, scheduling production, tracking inventory and making sure deliveries are on time.
“We try to make the best beer that we can so that people enjoy it and come back for more,” said Manol.

His personal favourite beers are pales ales, that is, lower in alcohol but with a late hop addition.
“I love it when a skeptical, somewhat nervous, person comes in to the brewery taproom and we take them through a personal tasting and then they leave with beer and a big smile. It’s fun to be a part of that experience.”

And Susan chimed in:
“Liking a craft beer brand, along with so many other commodities, for some, is an extension of their identity. Do you identify and relate to that brand? Does it align with your personal ethos and philosophies? Lululemon sells stretchy pants, but they definitely try to make you think it is more than that. We are a small family run business right in your community. You can visit and talk to us. We’re not a huge corporation with share-holders we need to answer to. We just try to stay authentic and real. But, with all that being said, there is only so far you can rely on good marketing, the product needs to be good, and that ultimately is the most important thing for us. We don’t like to be too heavy-handed with marketing. Yes, we need to promote and inform people about our beer and our brand, but I think most people feel very tired of being ‘marketed to’.”
She carries the title of ‘designer-in-chief’. Her background is Design and Art Direction where she spent 15 years of her career working for a major music label designing album packaging and promo materials for some of the biggest artists in the Canadian music industry.

“As exciting as that was, it was time for a change and joining Jeff at our brewery was a welcome transition,” said Susan.

“I design all the artwork for the beer labels, obviously. I really have fun with that, as my only client is me (well, and Jeff, but he is easy)! Basically, anything visual out there for the company is something I designed. I manage all the social media and designed and manage the website, online store, and I take photos for Instagram. I manage and execute all marketing for the company. The taproom is also my baby, I conceived and designed the look and feel of the space. I book and manage all the events out in the world and in the taproom. But I also do some sales, scheduling of the staff, and you’ll find me behind the bar from time to time,” added Susan.

“There are many styles I love. I like sours, Belgian and farmhouse beers, but the ones I turn to the most are a hoppy IPA or a well-crafted pale ale. Luckily, that is something Jeff is very good at. I still really like our Diving Horse Pale Ale. Nelson Sauvin hops are probably my favourite,” Susan said.

They had expansion plans to move to a 20 hectolitre system in January of 2019, starting small with floor drains and piping for water first.
However, the sudden demise of DME, one of Canada’s largest producers of brewing equipment in conjunction with Newlands of BC, has him wary but not awed.
“I expect we will find out how it plays as time goes on,” said Manol.

And as to the current haze-craze in beer, Manol considered and said this:
“I haven’t really thought much about it to be honest. I’ve noticed the trend and have been curious to taste and try my hand at the style because I’m a hop lover. Back when I was homebrewing years ago I always preferred massive late hopping additions in my homebrews anyways, I just never really made a big deal about how hazy it was, as long as it tasted good. ‘Follow the Flavour’ is my motto.”

Muddy York Brewing Company
22 Cranfield Road
Toronto ON M4B 3H1

mud york beer listJust some of the beers…

Pavilion Pale Ale is a 5.5 percent abv American pale ale. Charged with Cascade and Centennial hops to the tune of 35 IBUs, it pours a polished harvest gold colour, with a head of snow-white foam. Floral aromas mingle with fresh malt and a mild citrus note on the nose. On the palate, a slightly sweet malt flavour is intersected by a restrained hop bitterness. The finish has the pending arrival of a greater hop presence but it remains in tow, neatly and securely held in check in the background by a kiss of malt sweetness. All in all, a finely tuned and executed brew!
R-100 IPA rides in at 7 percent abv and a sturdy 70 IBUs! It pours a hazy golden colour, while releasing a big nose of fresh, green hops, namely, magnum, equinox and topaz. On the palate, there is a leading edge of fruit, which is quickly followed by a big bold hop bitterness. The finish is strongly bitter but not distressingly so! For a big beer, it all works in harmony, that is, it is very moreish!
Sokol Pilsner to a strength of 4.8 percent abv. It pours a straw colour with a puffy snow-white head of foam. Aromas of sweet, wet grains on the nose are pleasantly undercut by Czech Saaz hops on the palate. This is a gentle reminder of how beer tasted before the arrival of double IPAs and super sours.

Brick Maker Common is 5 percent abv and tops out at 35 IBUs. This polished amber coloured ale has dense white foam, while releasing rich malt aromas. On the palate, chewy malt is neatly spliced by a solid hop charge. The finish is reliably bitter on a sturdy malt base.

Switchboard Session IPA yields a hazy golden coloured ale hitting 5 percent abv with 25 IBUs. Fruits of a tropical nature are evident in the nose. It is both fruity and effervescent on the palate. The finish is pleasantly hop bitter and refreshing in nature. This is a keeper and a knockout for hot weather.

From Muddy York and its Ward Series is Ward 20, a pale, almost shrouded, golden coloured ale topping out at 5.6 percent abv. Featuring Ontario grown chinook hops to the tune of 30 IBUs, it presents a nose of citrus and background light malt notes. On the palate, soft hop and malt profiles co-mingle in a gentle manner. A bit further advanced on the tasting, tropical fruits try to express themselves more fully. The finish is subtle and not fully showcasing what this beer might be about.

Muddy York also has a dry-hopped lager, Resistance, utilizing Sarachi Ace hops to the tune of 18 IBUs. This 5.2 percent abv yellow coloured lager releases bright citrusy aromas. On the palate, a light, unassuming, bitterness develops on a soft, yet resilient, malt base. The finish is refreshingly crisp.

First up: 1793 Barley Wine, which is aged in a cognac barrel, and rolls out at 11.9 percent abv. This ale pours a reddish-brown colour and releases a great depth of aromas, with notes of raisins, plums and alcohol vibrantly stepping forward. There is a rich and creamy texture from the dark malts on the palate, with a late hit of black licorice sliding forward. The finish is deeply delicious and invokes a contemplative mood. It is a well-constructed ale with the 70 IBUs keeping it all in focus!

Second up: 1793 Barley Wine, this time out aged in a sherry barrel, while hitting 10 percent abv. In colour it is brown-black with reddish hues out at the edges. It features a bracing nose of black strap molasses and hints of sherry. On the palate, sherry-soaked raisins are prevalent. The finish is sleepy-time warming alcohol and demerara sugar flowing to the brain. Here too, the 70 IBUs are much needed and working finely in the background.

Victorian Secrets Pale Ale, a 5.2 percent abv ale pours a veiled pale straw colour. It is fruity with notes of pink grapefruit. On the palate, some graininess is evident, with hop bitterness gaining traction while pushing forward. The finish is hop bitter and moreish in nature.

Storm Glass IPA rolls in at 7 percent abv, while pouring a hazy pale golden colour. Tropical fruit aromas burst forth from the glass. On the palate, Equinox and Amarillo hops push forward over a study malt base. The finish is equal parts fruit and pit stone bitterness.

Yet another fine brew from Muddy York is the elongated My Absolutely Guaranteed Famous Olde Tyme Capitol Special Club Pale Ale. This 5.2 percent abv ale pours a veiled golden colour with a dense head of white foam. Abundant fresh green hop aromatics are revealed forthrightly. On the palate, it is assertively bitter on a supple malt backbone. The finish has a rolling wave of bitterness across the tongue.

Star Bright: Big Hop Delivery

iiipa-great-lakes-amsterdam

Once in a while a bright star of a beer flashes over my desk and lands in a tulip glass ready for tasting. Such a beer is Life Sentence IIIPA Southern Hemisphere, 10 percent abv, brewed in collaboration with the Great Lakes Brewery and the Amsterdam Brewery, both of Toronto.

 It has a purported 100+ IBUs from a hand selected 150 kilogram bale of Pacifica hops grown in Nelson, New Zealand, specifically bale # 47-4214.

 

This wondrous beer pours a soft veiled amber colour, while releasing intoxicating aromas of fresh green hops and alcohol on the nose. On the palate, juicy malt is relieved of its quantum load of hop bearing inner goodness as the mouth happily succumbs to a defining hop bitterness.

 

Still, while the hops are big and brassy and very much in charge, unrelenting in nature even, this wonderful and playful ale has enough malt backbone to keep it all in check. It’s a revelation in big beer delivery without killing the happy recipient’s joy of beer drinking!

The Exchange Brewery: Winner!

exchange exterior

 

The Great Ontario-Hopped Craft Beer Competition was won by The Exchange Brewery of Niagara-on-the-Lake less than a month after opening.

 

Teaming up with Clear Valley Hops of Nottawa, the Exchange Brewery brewed an American amber ale that clearly wowed the judges.

 

 

Owner Robin Ridesic hired brewer Sam Maxbauer from Michigan to oversee beer production at this well fitted out brewery that has both a main floor and an upstairs bar

 
The brewery is located in a heritage building dating from the 1880s and was formerly the site of Niagara’s first telephone exchange, thus the name of the brewery and the use of numbers in the naming of its beers. exchange brewery brewhouse

 

The Left Field Brewery, Toronto: Hits it Big time

DSC00158The Left Field Brewery of Toronto has come out swinging for the fences with beers such as Resin Bag, 6.9 percent abv and 50 IBUs, an American style IPA. Dressed with stylized home plate-shaped neck labels with illustrative art on the flip side, there is nothing but big league here on deck.

Resin Bag pours a rustic burnished chestnut colour, and it is way better than a resin bag on the mound, as it is a hop bag full of fresh green aromatic hops. It leads off with a starburst of hop bitterness down the line, sliding safely in to second with a well-played hop dynamic. The sprint to third is as easy as another sip of this hoppy brew. The finish is sharp and decisively bitter, with an un-tagged run over the plate. This is a fine and well executed beer of the style, that is, without malt overstepping its role as a sturdy backbone for the plentiful hops.
Well, I have to say I wasn’t that fond of this beer in its original incarnation brewed at an away-facility, but now with home field advantage, they’ve nailed it to the fence! Leftfieldbrewery.ca
DSC00157Another beer in the hearty Left Field Brewery lineup is Maris Pale Ale, striding in at 4.5 percent abv, and yes, obviously brewed with Maris Otter malt. It’s brewed in honour of Roger Maris who hit 61 home runs in 1961, breaking the record of legendary NYY Babe Ruth. Maris, while not revered by some Yankee fans, did get the job done. Maris PA delivers, much like its namesake, an early hit of malt that is capably backed up by a smack of hop bitterness in a sustained attack that is both balanced and forthright. Free of constraints, Maris clears the bases and trots home to a warm reception early in his career.

Originally appeared as part of my column in the Great Lakes Brewing News, June, July 2015.

Niagara Oast House Brewers, NOTL

In Niagara-on-the-Lake, brewmaster Kevin Somerville, the co-ordinator of the brewery program at Niagara College, and partners, Mike Berlis and Cian MacNeil, have opened Niagara Oast House Brewers in a big red barn, the former Forum Gallery building near to the old town, at 2017 Niagara Stone Road.

The brewery has installed a brand-new 20 barrel (23.4 HL) brewhouse from Specific Mechanical of British Columbia, with 4 X 20 barrel fermenters and a bright beer tank.

The brewery will be offering some bottle conditioned beers in 750 mL bottles under cork and cage. They plan to grow a small amount of hops at the brewery, and to partner with other people to grow hops locally.

It’s been quite a transformation from my previous visit when it was all gypsum board and powdery white dust to its present state of a large bar in the tasting room and the spiffy new reception area. The upstairs function room overlooking a vineyard (surely you mean hop yard?) is still under construction.

Kevin Somerville brewing Barnraiser County Ale. Image: Caroline Hughey

“We are brewing more seasonals than there are seasons,” said Kevin Somerville.

Barnraiser Country Ale, 5 percent abv, has a polished golden colour, with fresh malt and a whiff of hops on the nose. On the palate, a refreshing hop bitterness is released from the grasp of succulent malt, with just a hint of grain. The finish is led by a refined hop bitterness neatly over-layed on a crisp malt base. Barnraiser is not a big bold beer but rather is of the type that grows on you with each successive mouthful. Moreish, which after all is what a beer should be all about.

The Saison, 6.4 percent abv, part of the Farmhouse Ale Collection, is brewed in the Belgian style. A milky white head of dense foam caps a hazy golden coloured beer. Zesty and spicy aromas rise distinctly from the glass. On the palate, this refreshingly crisp and fruity ale,  has a tickle of alcohol and a gentle nip of carbonation. The finish of this bottle conditioned beer happily delivers more of the same.

Hop Rubbing, Toronto

ImageWhen 25 different varieties of leaf hops are being rubbed at once, releasing essential oils and volatiles, the air at the Black Oak Brewery, Toronto, was redolent with pungent aromatics of spicy Comet, earthy English Fuggle and floral Legacy hops. Palms were turning golden and green in equal measure as attendees at the second, ‘We love hops technical event’, gleefully rubbed their way to release the heavenly compounds of hops.

Hop rubbing is quite simply the best way to get to know what a particular hop variety has to offer the brewer. By placing a few hop cones in the palms of the hands and rubbing vigorously, literally pulverizing the cones, and then cupping the hands to contain and direct the resulting aromatics directly into the nose, is a technique that never fails to deliver the goods.

Nicholas Schaut, president of The Ontario Hop Growers Association, spoke on behalf of the 18 hop growers who are working diligently to grow the industry in this province. This was followed by Evan Elford, OMAFRA, speaking about the need for hop research in Ontario and relationship building between microbrewers and hop growers.

Following some tasty burgers catered by Brock Shepherd of the Burger Bar of Toronto, Diana and Stacy Puterbaugh, Hops Direct of Washington, spoke about the U.S. Hop Acreage Report and hop growing techniques.

Seven unique single-hop beers and Black Oak Pale Ale and Nut Brown, as well as Augusta Ale from the Kensington Brewing Company were available for sampling.

The well attended event was organized by Bob Latimer of Beer and Wine Filter and importer of Puterbaugh hops, and James Tien of the Muskoka Brewery in Bracebridge.

Image